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Alexander Reeds Alexander Classique Sopranino   

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Alexander Classique Sopranino Saxophone Reeds The result of many months of developing and testing prototypes yielded the original "Alexander Superial...Click To Read More About This Product

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Alexander Classique Sopranino Saxophone Reeds

The result of many months of developing and testing prototypes yielded the original "Alexander Superial" which was designed to produce a warm, resonant "buzz", good projection, even scale throughout the registers, and a wide dynamic range. This was in line with the tonal concept of the "American" style single cut reeds, but with more developed heart and rear vamp area. A reed with too much of the heart or this vamp section (towards the back of the slope) taken out may seem easy to blow at first, but it will not usually last as long and will tend to generate less of a "spring" and natural resistance needed to produce a really big sound. We ran an extensive testing program with various professionals and we were also fortunate enough to have the valuable feedback from the renowned veteran mouthpiece maker Ralph Morgan, his excellent crew and others. After all our testing confirmed the good results of the final prototype, we believed we had finally come up with a reed worthy of manufacture. The combination of a new design influenced by traditional reed making concepts (and therefore in essence "time proven"), and the highest grade of cane we could find, became born as the original Alexander Superial with its yellow labeled tin.Notes on Superial
Alexander Superial and Superial "DC" are available in Alto, Tenor, Baritone saxophones, and Bb Clarinet. Alexander Superial "Classique" comes in Soprano, Alto, Tenor, Baritone and Bass saxophones , and Bb Soprano, German, and Bass Clarinets... The reeds are strength graded from numbers 1.5 - 5. Check our "Reed Comparison Chart"page for more related information. We suggest that you break the reeds in by first soaking them for about 2-4 minutes in lukewarm to warm water, and making sure that the whole vamp, and not just the tip alone, gets wet (a reed that is too dry or only wet at the very tip might tend to squeak). Some players, especially in dry weather, prefer a little more soaking time and a some others like immersing the whole reed in the water. Then again, if you soak it for too long, it may end up becoming waterlogged, so try a balanced approach. And make sure you wet the reed each succeeding time you play thereafter, though you may find that as it gets broken in, less soaking time will be necessary.... After the soaking is operation is done, place the reed you want to prepare on glass or a similar flat surface and massage it (starting from the back of the vamp slope) with your finger or fingers several strokes forward towards the tip, in order to help close off the fiber ends and stabilize the cane. Then comes the break-in secret, which is certainly no original idea of mine, but a time tested practice for reed longevity: Break in the reeds you prepare by only playing them at no louder than mp-m and for the first day only a few minutes and maybe 5-10 minutes the second day. By breaking them in at mezzo or softer and for not too long in the first couple of days, the reeds should last longer and be more stable for full bore playing later. Playing them all out in fortissimo from the first 2 days might overstress the tips. The exception to the break in is: If the new reed you try feels a good bit too hard, you can skip the break in period and just play in normally from the first day. A tendency of these reeds is to harden a little after a few days of playing, so you may find a slightly softer reed that will end up being perfect in a few days after break in. If you find a reed that is too hard even if you skip the break in... DON'T THROW IT AWAY...IT MAY WELL BE SAVED!! Here is a trick that Joe Henderson showed me years ago which really works and saved me many reed both in practice sessions and on live gigs... With the reed wet and ligatured to the mouthpiece, press firmly a few times with your thumb on the middle and rear slope area of the reed to help loosen up the fibers a bit and make it less resistant. This will take you some practice to perfect, because if you press too firmly, you will get a reed with too little resistance and possibly end up taking the spring and life out of it. But once you master the operation by feeling the right amount and number of presses it takes, you may find yourself with a vastly improved, custom reed! Try a press or two, play it, and try again if need be...it will be worth it once you see the results.... We also recommend that you keep your dry, unplayed reeds or box of reeds in a plastic ziplock bag to keep the reed moisture stable. Atmospheric changes will effect reed performance and this seems to keep them moisture balanced. From our experience and from many of the comments we've received from Superial users everywhere, the percentage of good playing reeds per box seems to be fairly high. Incidentally, the setup minus the reed, ie., the neck, mouthpiece, and ligature, must all be in perfect working order for the tonal response of the instrument to reach its maximum efficiency. And visa versa, an instrument with pad leaks or adjustment problems, a band or synthetic type ligature that is worn or doesn't provide even and sufficient pressure on the stock of the reed, a mouthpiece that is out of correct


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