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Oasis OH-19 Fingernail Shaper  

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#H76108000000000
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  • MSRP:
    $4.95
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    - $1.00
  • Your Price:
    $395

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Oasis

A must have tool for guitarists.

The Oasis OH-19 Fingernail Shaper is designed for classical and finger-style guitarists who play with their nails. Each of the four foam pads is mounted on a curved hard plastic base that allows the user excellent control to shape their nails just they way they want. Pads are 320, 600,1200, and 3000 grit.


 
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by PowerReviews
OasisOH-19 Fingernail Shaper
 
4.7

(based on 3 reviews)

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  • 5 Stars

     

    (2)

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    (1)

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Reviewed by 3 customers

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(2 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

OH19 FINGERNAIL SHAPER - not a

By LeftHandThumb

from Denmark

About Me Experienced

Pros

  • Easy To Use
  • Good For Polishing
  • Good Quality
  • Improves Sound

Cons

  • Not For Shaping At All

Best Uses

  • Concerts
  • Finishing Touches

Comments about Oasis OH-19 Fingernail Shaper:

I bought one when i was experimenting with artificial nails, nailplektors, filing and polishing. It isn't at all what the headline say, and therfore i didn't rate it "functional". But it's the final touches of a good polishing, it does that well, so i couldn't rate it "not functional" either. And i'm here to get 3 more for traveling gear and reserve.
The first still work fine, and seem able to survive in my bathroom for years before wear will become an isue of importance.

I work on dry nails and use rough diamond file for sizing and shaping. Then fine grained glass file with finer diamond for aditional trimming the shape and smoothing the grinded surface. Working on the underside of the nail on the pickside, and on the front side of the nail on the stroke side - because my nails grow in spoon shape, and working in those angels let me shape the edge leading up to the point of release, so it bends away from the release - as oposed to bending towards it like a hook.

Nails come in various shapes, another extreme is chiselshape, and you have to develop your own mechanikal shaping depending on your grown shape, and the teknikes you use to pick, pluck strike and hit or whatever you do.

This is as far a rookie need to go. Experiment with the shapes and size, (note you can't grow long nails if you work hard and have fragile nails like me. We just need to be more precise with shorter nails). Get a good routine fretting your chords, and esperiment with the fingers atacking until you get a good sound.
Having that you can go further, not by buying a more expensive guitar, since polishing nails will give much more improvment in the sound for much less money.

An expensive guitar is waist of money if you play it with worn strings and rough nails.

A good shape of nails is escential to finger playing techniks, but you can improve the sound further by smoothing the atack surface more. The importance of the atack is far underrated in guitar playing, though it should be obvious to everybody just by watching the huge number of different plektors offered.
Notice most of them have smooth atack surfaces.
For some songs, we may feel the right sound come from and old plywood guitar with worn strings, ratteling like a flamenco, fretted with fingernoise, spiced by whines from plumes sliding along the strings, and atacked with torn scratchy nails, but for pure beauty you will find flawless fretting, exact atack and polishing the nails are improvments.

I use water polishing paper (dry) grit 600, 800, 1000 on same surfaces as the files, but also a tiny bit on the edges for partial deburring. Then 1200, 1500, 2000 and 2500 on bott underside, front and upperside of the nails working off all the burrs and rounding and polishing the sharp edges. Papers are used one after the other in the order mentioned (notice lovest grit is roughest), each erasing the deeper grinding pattern left by the previsious and replaising it with a finer. You can't actualy see it with the naked eye, but experience show 3 to 5 light short touches works. I slide it along the edge of the nail in centimeter short movments right beside where i suport the paper with a finger on the other hand, meaning presure is only around the force needed to bent the paper.

The OH-19 tool has 4 different surfaces marked 1, 2, 3 and 4, (1 being the roughest). The bag says grit 320, 600, 1200 and 3000.
The grain sizes don't corespondent to the ones used on the paper. You'l often find such variations by grinding. This paper is made for metal, the OH-19 for nails, the paper is aplied with caborondum and it's probably some other material on the polisher. Grid seems determined by various things, where grain size is just one factor. It turns out lager grains may polish finer when they'r of softer material.

In such cases i learn by trying. Turns out the OH grid 320 seems to have grains about the size on my grid 1000 paper, and grind rougher than my final 2500 paper. OH grid 600 has grains around the 1500 paper, but polish smoother than my 2500 paper, so i don't use the OH 320, but go 600, 1200 and end with 3000 once dry, and then again 3000 with a drop of water. Now the edges of the nails shine when held up in light, and make the strings ring like heavenly bells.

The OH have grains on thin foam mounted on a flexible plastic suport giving a sturdy yet flexible counterpresure, and i use much more force when polishing on it, but also far more and longer strokes than i use with the paper produced for grinding metal.

Maybe you could go directly from a glass file to the GH polisher by using the 320 surface, but i suspect it would take far more time, because the GH made for soft material remove far less than paper with same grain size (possible other grit) made for hard materials. At least i would expect to save time with paper at least 800 and 1200 with more strokes than i use now, between a fine file and the GH-19, but i don't even care for trying, because i work on playing with pointed nails, and the more strokes - the greater chanse of rounding the point. I'm rather considering gluing the paper to stiff cartoon, to work more precise with greater persure and fewer strokes on each gridsize.

Sry if i'm hard to understand. My native language is danish.

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(1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

Good but may not be for everyone

By de Lunger

from Berkeley, CA

About Me Experienced

Verified Buyer

Pros

  • Easy To Use
  • Good Quality

Cons

    Best Uses

      Comments about Oasis OH-19 Fingernail Shaper:

      I think this is a good product. I must, nonetheless, say that it is good for final touches after one has shaped the nail. That means for ultra smoothing the nail. The reason is it has surfaces that are basically too fine to shape the nail. Even the 320 grit surface (which is the roughest of all) is not rough enough to start filing the nail down with. However, to smooth the nail out to any desired accuracy it is a very good product.

      Comment on this review

      (1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

       
      4.0

      A must-have for guitar players!

      Comments about Oasis OH-19 Fingernail Shaper:

      The Oasis OH-19 is another great product for guitarists from a great company. There is no need to worry about using feminine looking nail shapers anymore thanks to this tool. I have been playing classical guitar for almost a year now, and I have always had trouble shaping my nails. I used to use emery boards, but all I use is this now. The different grits are numbered by order of use, and it is bigger than I had originally anticipated which is great! Also, it leaves your nails very smooth and shiny which is great because I personally hate it the feeling of rough nails on nylon. The only downside is that the grits are very fine, so I suggest sizing your nails with a regular file, then shaping them with this tool.

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