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Rogue 6-String Banjo Natural 

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#513449000010000
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Overview

  • Mahogany Resonator with Thumb Screws
  • Mahogany Neck
  • 3-Ply Maple Rim
Description & Specs
  • MSRP:
    $247.99
  • Your Savings:
    - $48.00
  • On Sale Today:
    - $20.00
  • Sale Price:
    $17999

In Stock & Ready To Ship

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      Rogue

      Brings the down-home tone of the banjo and the playability of the guitar together into one great instrument.

      The 6-string banjo is tuned like a guitar, and features a short scale length and jumbo frets for very easy playability.

      Features

      • Mahogany Resonator with Thumb Screws
      • Mahogany Neck
      • 3-Ply Maple Rim
      • 24 Brackets
      • Geared Tuners

      It's the perfect axe for guitarists who want to get into another stringed instrument. Put it in your collection today.

       
      Customer Reviews
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      Review Snapshot®

      by PowerReviews
      Rogue6-String Banjo
       
      4.0

      (based on 21 reviews)

      Ratings Distribution

      • 5 Stars

         

        (9)

      • 4 Stars

         

        (8)

      • 3 Stars

         

        (1)

      • 2 Stars

         

        (0)

      • 1 Stars

         

        (3)

      100%

      of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

      Pros

      • Good tone (3)

      Cons

        Best Uses

          Most Liked Positive Review

           

          Excellent Value! Great Fun To Play!

          The Rogue 6 string banjo is a great little starter instrument for a guitarist who wants to add a new type of sound to their music. The pros are obvious,
          it's inexpensive...Read complete review

          The Rogue 6 string banjo is a great little starter instrument for a guitarist who wants to add a new type of sound to their music. The pros are obvious,
          it's inexpensive & you don't need to learn to play a real banjo. I've been having a blast playing this, it's great fun. I live in Canada, I ordered the banjo on April 30 & I received it on May 6th, well packaged & in perfect condition. This is my second Rogue instrument, I also own a Rogue lap steel. They make some great inexpensive instruments. The quality/price/value ratio is excellent! Perhaps it's just the novelty but I love playing this banjo... just as much as I do playing my expensive guitars.
          There is a bit of a learning curve when it comes to setting this up, you have to approach it more from a banjo standpoint...Purists will probably disagree, but it really is a banjo - it just happens to be tuned like a guitar & have six strings. I spent a few days on the internet gathering some useful tips on setup. Be sure to check out You Tube. Experienced guitarists should have no trouble, but I've decided to list some basic setup tips below that might help you save some valuable time. If you are totally new at this and unsure - take the instrument to a music shop for a professional setup.

          Basic 6 String Banjo Set-up Guide

          Tools Required:

          A Measuring Tape
          Electronic Tuner
          (and the supplied tools in the box)

          Step 1

          Carefully remove the mahogany resonator (the back) from the banjo head.
          (It is held in place by 4 bolts)

          Step 2

          Tighten all of the screws inside the wall of the banjo rim -
          Next tighten all of the bolts (the brackets) using the supplied tool.
          Start slowly - it's best to just give them a small ¼ turn at first.

          Rather than work in a circular motion - work in different sections, remembering where you left off, so that tension is distributed evenly . Repeat the process 2 - 3 times, until everything is good & tight. Be careful not to over tighten - IF YOU HEAR A SQUEAKING NOISE STOP & loosen the bracket - to avoid potential damage to the banjo.

          Check to see that the banjo head feels even (run your hand along the top of the surface).

          Step 3

          Loosen all the strings, & place the bridge on the banjo. Measure from the face of the nut to the middle of the 12th fret ( approx. 11.5 inches - dbl that number to approx 23", & place the bridge in the middle of the banjo head.

          Tune the high "E" string using a good electronic tuner. Gently fret the octave (place your finger on the string & pluck it). Check your tuner - if your tuner reads E flat, move the bridge toward the fingerboard. If your tuner reads E sharp, move the bridge toward the tailpiece. Now do the same with the low "E" string.

          ** I have found that a distance of 22 ¾ inches provides proper bridge placement & intonation "**

          Step 4

          Using your tuner tighten & tune all the other strings. The strings are new - so they will stretch for a while & it will be hard to keep in tune at first.

          Something that helps is applying some graphite powder into the slots of the nut (simply grab a sharp lead pencil & tap lighly into the grooves creating a powder), then place your strings back in the grooves & tune-the strings.

          Step 5

          Play around with your banjo. There is a tension rod inside (under the Banjo head, skin) which you can adjust easily with your hand to tweak the tone & playability. (Do not remove the truss rod cover and adjust at the headstock, unless you know what you are doing. Truss rods can be broken by tightening too much).

          A little experimentation & you should be good to go.

          A simple good test for correct intonation is the intro to the Beatles "Eight Days A Week". It's played on the 10th, 12th, & 15th frets using the bottom 3 strings - The chords are Dadd9, E, G6, & Dadd9. (You should be able to find the chord structure on the internet).

          Step 6

          If everything sounds good…
          Reattach the back of the banjo resonator using the 4 bolts.
          Your Rogue 6 string should be set up. Enjoy your instrument.

          VS

          Most Liked Negative Review

           

          I like it

          For a starter instrument, it works well enough...this banjo does not replace the six-string acoustic guitar, but is a good compromise between the two.

          For a starter instrument, it works well enough...this banjo does not replace the six-string acoustic guitar, but is a good compromise between the two.

          Reviewed by 21 customers

          Sort by

          Displaying reviews 1-10

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          (1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

           
          4.0

          IT IS A 6 STRING NOT A 5

          By WICKTANA

          from HIXSON, TN

          About Me Professional Musician

          Ask me a question

          Pros

          • Consistent
          • Good Tone

          Cons

          • Poor Instructions

          Best Uses

          • Backup

          Comments about Rogue 6-String Banjo:

          There are several good reviews on here that tell you how to set this banjo up. It's a good thing there are since it comes without the bridge in place and no instructions on how to do it. However, once you have figured out how to put everything into place. This is a real 6 string banjo that sounds pretty good for the money. If your looking for a bluegrass sound then don't purchase this banjo. This will not replace a 5 string nor should one expect it to. I agree with one review that suggested replacing the low E with a high one. By doing this it does give you a little more of a bluegrass sound. It is a fun instrument to play and the price is not bad at all for what you get. It's loud, and can be picked or strummed much like an acoustic.

          Comment on this review

          (16 of 16 customers found this review helpful)

           
          5.0

          Excellent Value! Great Fun To Play!

          By The 6th Beatle

          from Montreal

          About Me Experienced

          Pros

          • Good Tone
          • Great Price Good Quality
          • Has Authentic Banjo Sound
          • Short Scale Neck Is Sweet

          Cons

          • Needs Proper Setup

          Best Uses

          • Home Recording
          • Jamming
          • Performing
          • Practicing

          Comments about Rogue 6-String Banjo:

          The Rogue 6 string banjo is a great little starter instrument for a guitarist who wants to add a new type of sound to their music. The pros are obvious,
          it's inexpensive & you don't need to learn to play a real banjo. I've been having a blast playing this, it's great fun. I live in Canada, I ordered the banjo on April 30 & I received it on May 6th, well packaged & in perfect condition. This is my second Rogue instrument, I also own a Rogue lap steel. They make some great inexpensive instruments. The quality/price/value ratio is excellent! Perhaps it's just the novelty but I love playing this banjo... just as much as I do playing my expensive guitars.
          There is a bit of a learning curve when it comes to setting this up, you have to approach it more from a banjo standpoint...Purists will probably disagree, but it really is a banjo - it just happens to be tuned like a guitar & have six strings. I spent a few days on the internet gathering some useful tips on setup. Be sure to check out You Tube. Experienced guitarists should have no trouble, but I've decided to list some basic setup tips below that might help you save some valuable time. If you are totally new at this and unsure - take the instrument to a music shop for a professional setup.

          Basic 6 String Banjo Set-up Guide

          Tools Required:

          A Measuring Tape
          Electronic Tuner
          (and the supplied tools in the box)

          Step 1

          Carefully remove the mahogany resonator (the back) from the banjo head.
          (It is held in place by 4 bolts)

          Step 2

          Tighten all of the screws inside the wall of the banjo rim -
          Next tighten all of the bolts (the brackets) using the supplied tool.
          Start slowly - it's best to just give them a small ¼ turn at first.

          Rather than work in a circular motion - work in different sections, remembering where you left off, so that tension is distributed evenly . Repeat the process 2 - 3 times, until everything is good & tight. Be careful not to over tighten - IF YOU HEAR A SQUEAKING NOISE STOP & loosen the bracket - to avoid potential damage to the banjo.

          Check to see that the banjo head feels even (run your hand along the top of the surface).

          Step 3

          Loosen all the strings, & place the bridge on the banjo. Measure from the face of the nut to the middle of the 12th fret ( approx. 11.5 inches - dbl that number to approx 23", & place the bridge in the middle of the banjo head.

          Tune the high "E" string using a good electronic tuner. Gently fret the octave (place your finger on the string & pluck it). Check your tuner - if your tuner reads E flat, move the bridge toward the fingerboard. If your tuner reads E sharp, move the bridge toward the tailpiece. Now do the same with the low "E" string.

          ** I have found that a distance of 22 ¾ inches provides proper bridge placement & intonation "**

          Step 4

          Using your tuner tighten & tune all the other strings. The strings are new - so they will stretch for a while & it will be hard to keep in tune at first.

          Something that helps is applying some graphite powder into the slots of the nut (simply grab a sharp lead pencil & tap lighly into the grooves creating a powder), then place your strings back in the grooves & tune-the strings.

          Step 5

          Play around with your banjo. There is a tension rod inside (under the Banjo head, skin) which you can adjust easily with your hand to tweak the tone & playability. (Do not remove the truss rod cover and adjust at the headstock, unless you know what you are doing. Truss rods can be broken by tightening too much).

          A little experimentation & you should be good to go.

          A simple good test for correct intonation is the intro to the Beatles "Eight Days A Week". It's played on the 10th, 12th, & 15th frets using the bottom 3 strings - The chords are Dadd9, E, G6, & Dadd9. (You should be able to find the chord structure on the internet).

          Step 6

          If everything sounds good…
          Reattach the back of the banjo resonator using the 4 bolts.
          Your Rogue 6 string should be set up. Enjoy your instrument.

          Comment on this review

          (0 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

           
          4.0

          Great buy

          By josexpressions

          from Atlanta, GA

          About Me Experienced

          Verified Buyer

          Pros

          • Good Tone

          Cons

            Best Uses

              Comments about Rogue 6-String Banjo:

              solid, sounds good

              Comment on this review

              (0 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

               
              3.0

              I like it

              By josexpressions

              from Atlanta, GA

              Comments about Rogue 6-String Banjo:

              For a starter instrument, it works well enough...this banjo does not replace the six-string acoustic guitar, but is a good compromise between the two.

              Comment on this review

              (5 of 5 customers found this review helpful)

               
              4.0

              Nice instrument...Great Value!

              By ACOUSTIC JOHNNY

              from Myrtle Beach, SC

              Ask me a question

              Comments about Rogue 6-String Banjo:

              I am a professional musician and a collector of stringed instruments. Initially, I was hesitant to purchase the Rogue 6 string banjo. I am glad that I did! The bangitar arrived in a few days, and I was pleasantly surprised by the quality of the instrument. Although, setting it up took some tweaking. The placement of the bridge, tightening the head and a neck adjustment were critical for correct intonation. Once adjusted, the banjo was easily tuned, and it sounded good. I then attached a Dean Markley adhesive pickup, plugged into a L.R. Baggs Venue acoustic DI to a Fishman Loudbox Mini, and I was pickin' and grinning. The Rogue 6 string banjo is a fine instrument, a great value and a nice addition to my collection!
              .

              Comment on this review

              (14 of 14 customers found this review helpful)

               
              5.0

              Does what I wanted

              By William Miller

              from East coast, USA

              Comments about Rogue 6-String Banjo:

              Had to adjust the action, otherwise no problem. People that have complained about this instrument need to know what they are getting. DO NOT expect this instrument to take the place of a 5 string banjo. If you are interested in bluegrass or old timey music, do yourself a favor and learn 5 string. I bought this because I love finger style country blues, and early swing (or New Orleans style ragtime). This thing is great for these types of applications without having to learn Tenor Banjo. Think Tom Waits, or Squirrel Nut Zippers type of sounds, not Bluegrass.
              Much better hardware than I expected for the price. I have an old Kay Tenor Banjo from the late 50's. This is much better made actually.
              Beautiful finish and cherry stain. Binding on neck and body. Nice attention to detail. Could probably use better tuners but these are much better than the cheap banjos of yester-year. The action arrived high but was an easy fix and now plays like a dream.
              For the price, amazing.

              Comment on this review

              (1 of 9 customers found this review helpful)

               
              1.0

              Waste of Money

              By Jackson-r-u4r

              from california

              Comments about Rogue 6-String Banjo:

              I received this as a gift and I feel sorry for my friend who paid for it. Looks good, but it is not well made at all. I cannot buy any parts for it as simple as the tuning buttons. Cannot tune it, bridge is a mess. Really looked forward to playing and using this. Save your money and get a good banjo that you can get parts for.

              Comment on this review

              (2 of 9 customers found this review helpful)

               
              1.0

              poor product

              By Anonymous

              from Undisclosed

              Comments about Rogue 6-String Banjo:

              I have wanted this banjo for years and now I realized I have wasted a lot of my time. do not buy this instrument. You will need alot of skill and time to make it playable unless you have luthier skills.

              Comment on this review

              (10 of 11 customers found this review helpful)

               
              4.0

              How to set it up-makes all the difference

              By Ted the Cryogenic Man

              from Concord, NC

              Comments about Rogue 6-String Banjo:

              Very disappointing and hung on the wall for 2 years. Bad tone, won't stay in tune. Finally looked at it from a technician's perspective. Duh' the bridge is way too low. [I usually cut down guitar bridges]. Other bridges are available [try FQMS]. I glued a strip on the bottom of mine and increased bridge height by 5/16 or so inch. Totally different instrument now. Strung with thinnest strings I know of [Super Slinky} and replaced bottom "E" with a high "E" to replicate the banjo sound. Intonation is now correct and stays in tune O.K. Can handle bar chords up to 7th fret. Not the world's most versatile instrument but has it's place in certain songs. High bridge eliminated fret buzz and dull sound. It is LOUD. Takes about an hour and basic tools [and gorilla glue} to raise the bridge. Use hard wood like oak, ash, maple [my walnut looks good]. Be sure to sand bottom flat with paper on flat table and rub bridge on paper. Can e-mail me for details on how to do. Tighten the head about 1/2 turn on bolts while you're at it and use a thin pick. Times change. Nothing works anymore right out of the box. Fix it and play on...

              Comment on this review

              (9 of 10 customers found this review helpful)

               
              4.0

              Not at all bad for the price

              By Psaltseller

              from Gates Oregon and Paramount California

              Comments about Rogue 6-String Banjo:

              I've played 6-string banjo since 1966. It is not an imitation anything, it's a perfectly valid instrument in its own right, in the same way that a tenor banjo is a real instrument. My original instruments are getting a little fragile, and I needed something to take with me on my travels. For this price, I wasn't expecting perfection. What I did get was an instrument that took less work to set up than a major-name instrument a friend of mine bought via a well-known auction site.You can't frail it like a 5-string banjo, you can't just strum open-string chords, but if you let your thumb carry the melody and treat the trebles as a modifying drone, it works just fine. You want perfection, go spend more money, but if you don't play the instrument on its own terms, no matter what the instrument, no amount of money will make up the difference.

              Comment on this review

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